January 30, 2023

Here’s an example of how chimpanzees are so like us [link]Most commercial video games and brain training games do not improve cognitive skills. An exception are action video games “including first-person shooter games, [which] can continually exercise your perceptual attention with immediate feedback, under a variety of ever-changing contexts, and with increasing levels of challenge.”

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January 26, 2023

We make hundreds of decisions every day, from simple decisions such as what to wear to significant life and business decisions. All of these decisions have an emotional component, even if we’re not aware of our underlying emotion. In fact, research has shown that “emotions constitute potent, pervasive, predictable, sometimes harmful and sometimes beneficial drivers

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January 12, 2023

Here are six interesting new neuroscience studies I came across recently: Why you may be overeating We already know that seeing pictures of food increases nervous system arousal. However, even subliminal pictures, pictures that we are not conscious of, also increase nervous system arousal. And this was related to emotional eating and conscious decisions to

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November 25, 2022

We all know that our breath sustains life through the rhythmic exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. We also know through yoga and meditation practices that slow rhythmic breathing is a way to regulate our emotions. But what is not well known is that breathing also influences our brain. “New evidence demonstrates that the act

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November 11, 2022

The research on the links between digestion, mood, health, and even the way you think has been exploding in recent years. And it’s no longer possible to ignore the intimate relationship between the gut and the brain.  Scientists used to think that the only way that the gut talked to the brain was through the

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October 20, 2022

Here are six interesting new neuroscience studies I came across recently: Listening to white noise can help you focus Listening to white noise at 45 dB can improve “sustained attention, accuracy, and speed of performance, as well as enhance creativity and lower stress levels.” White noise at 65 dB can lead to “improved working memory

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